From today's Science: Researchers have built a microarray designed
to study the interactions of thousands of proteins simultaneously, helping to
uncover their function. As more and more genomes are sequenced, these protein
microarrays will play a large role in deciphering these genetic codes and understanding
how the genes function. The microarray designed by Gavin MacBeath and Stuart L.
Schreiber fixes proteins on a smooth, flat glass microscope slide in a way that
preserves their folded structure. Since the slide keeps these structures intact,
with all sides of the proteins able to interact with other proteins or molecules,
the microarray can be loaded with thousands of proteins and used to screen for
protein-protein interactions, to identify the protein targets of small molecules,
and to identify enzyme targets. (From Science press release.)

References: MacBeath G, and Schreiber SL. Printing proteins as microarrays for high-throughput function determination. Science 2000 Sep 8;289(5485):1760-3. Abstract

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References

Paper Citations

  1. . Printing proteins as microarrays for high-throughput function determination. Science. 2000 Sep 8;289(5485):1760-3. PubMed.

Further Reading

Papers

  1. . Printing proteins as microarrays for high-throughput function determination. Science. 2000 Sep 8;289(5485):1760-3. PubMed.

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Primary Papers

  1. . Printing proteins as microarrays for high-throughput function determination. Science. 2000 Sep 8;289(5485):1760-3. PubMed.